About the author of this post: Bart de Bruijn (PhD) is a demographer and development sociologist. As a consultant in population and development he provides technical assistance in the field of household surveys and population censuses to UN agencies and governments in developing countries and countries in transition. Since 2009 he is involved as Chief […]

This is a post by Evgenia Bystrov based on her article Testing the Second Demographic Transition Theory with Seemingly Unrelated Regression: Marital Postponement and Human Empowerment recently published in the European Sociological Review. The article focuses on the relations between values and marriage behaviour. The writing of this article was triggered by numerous academic debates […]

The World Cup begins this week, in the face of controversy over corruption and venality in FIFA and continuing protests in the host nation Brazil against the incredible cost of the tournament and the harsh crackdowns on favela residents. Apart from the obvious moral and political debates, there are interesting demographic angles that could be taken […]

This is a post by Heini Väisänen based on her article “Social Inequalities in Teenage Fertility Outcomes: Childbearing and Abortion Trends of Three Birth Cohorts in Finland”. Heini Väisänen is a PhD candidate in demography at the London School of Economics and Political Science. In the media, Finland is often displayed as an example of […]

Does working as a researcher cause your eyesight to become strained, your back to become hunched, and your social life to become rather limited? Or is this just an association? The fact that I’m even asking this question probably suggests that I need to get out more. But the question of causality arises frequently in […]

This is a post by Dr Meredith Tavener based on her article “Expert perceptions of the popular baby boomer image”. Dr Tavener is a Research Fellow at the Priority Research Centre for Gender, Health and Ageing, University of Newcastle, Australia.   No longer a secret: the world population is ageing! Accompanying some general concerns about […]

Eva Kibele’s (E.U.B.Kibele@rug.nl) guest post is based on her PhD thesis “Regional mortality differences in Germany”, written while she was with the Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research and supervised by James W. Vaupel, Gabriele Doblhammer and Vladimir Shkolnikov. Currently she is a postdoc researcher at the Population Research Center of the University of Groningen, […]

Malaria is one of the toughest and deadliest diseases of all time. This potentially deadly, but preventable mosquito-borne parasitic disease caused an estimated 627,000 deaths worldwide in 2012, with approximately 77% occurring in children under the age of five. However, the actual number of  deaths due to malaria may be even higher; an interesting study […]

Last year, Yang & Land released their book on age-period-cohort (APC) analysis. A large section of the December issue of Demography is dedicated to age-period-cohort analysis. And just a week or two ago a paper by Bell & Jones on the Yang & Land APC model was published in Demographic Research. APC analysis appears to […]

Open access has been a hot topic in academic communities recently. In the UK, recent changes in policy by the government and Research Councils have led to concerns that the revenues of publishing companies are being protected at the expense of the publicly-funded science budget. Elsewhere, the quality of some open access journals has been put […]

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